My scammer

Unfortunatly there are men out there who think they can get away with using and abusing women. Wrong! We'll Name and Shame them here.

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happyhippycaz
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My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Sat May 12, 2012 8:51 pm

In January of this year I got a friend request on Facebook by someone calling himself Sgt Mark Seymour David, he claimed that he was a US soldier based in Afghanistan. I spent a couple of months talking to him on Facebook, but then started speaking to him on yahoo messenger. After a while he started telling me that he loved me and wanted me to apply for his leave forms. He gave me an email address to which I wrote and got a letter and 2 forms claiming to be from the US Leave Department. On the letter it said that 750 USD would have to be paid for the processing fee. When I spoke to him later he asked me if I would pay this sum and he would give it to me back when he came to see me out of his leave bonus. Not long after this amount changed to 2000 USD because he said that he now wanted to marry me. I got concerned about the amount he was asking for and looked back at the email letter and leave forms that I had been sent. I noticed the bad spelling and grammar and so decided to put the address from the top of the forms into Google earth, it came back that it did not exist. I then typed the address in internet explorer and straightaway it came up with a warning from scamwarners that this address was being used in a scam. After I spent a lot of time searching I can across an American military site where they tell you what to look out for and they are trying to catch the people behind these military dating scams. I sent off the letter, leave forms, what he was asking me, his profile pictures, the 2 ID cards he sent me, and got a reply telling me I was being scammed. Since this time I have managed to find my scammer on another 2 different networking sites called Hi5 and Tagged, he is still using the name Mark Seymour and is still using the same profile picture. I have been on youtube and found out that this soldiers picture is being used quite often in scams.
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Re: My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Sat May 12, 2012 8:58 pm

Forgot to add the pictures :-
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Re: My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Sat May 12, 2012 9:02 pm

Got another 3 pictures
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Sat May 12, 2012 11:11 pm

This post definitely belongs in the Men Who Scam Women Section. I guess Saul will have to move this over to there. Thank you for posting this. More than likely this Army scam came from a Nigerian scammer pretending to be a real soldier.

You are correct that you noticed (1) the bad grammar/spelling (a common feature with these Military dating scams) and another feature with these scammers happens to be (2) their overwhelming politeness and also (3) their use of a messenger chat software because they want to take you away from the site they met you on. Also (4) they are very quick to tell you that they "love" you in a very short space of time which is a lie of course.

Military dating scammers are serious deceivers and they are not to be played around with at all. I have seen too many stories of heartbreak that these crooks have done to other people that I can tell you about.
:((
Last edited by TheTruthTeller on Tue May 15, 2012 4:27 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Sun May 13, 2012 1:31 pm

Yes he definetly came from Nigeria I did an IP check on the last email that he sent me and it even showed you what town and street it came from. Would never dream of playing with them they scare the hell out of me the more I learn. The website which I mentioned is an American army website and the soldiers on there are the ones trying to catch the scammers.
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Re: My scammer

Post by Saul » Sun May 13, 2012 5:35 pm

Many thanks for posting this info and the photo's. If i can grab some time later I will also stick all this on the front of the web site.

I'm so glad to hear you had the common sense to check this out before sending money. There are so many people who get conned by these scum bags every day. The more publicity we can give to it the better. You have very likely saved a lot of women being taken in by this.

Isn't it about time the Nigerian government took firm and decisive steps to clamp down on these scammers? Or do they not mind their country being constantly dragged through the mud?
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Mon May 14, 2012 1:41 am

Hmm, Funny that Saul should mention the Nigerian government. Actually Nigerian scammers are even sending out fake letters of apology that "claim" to be from the Nigerian government. :-o

Here is the proof of this from the site known as christinagleason.com:
:-?

"I just received this fantastic email:

Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Federal Republic of Nigeria

Ref: An Open Letter To All Scam Victims,

If you have sent money to Nigeria in the course of getting one fund or the other it means you have been scammed because those funds will surely not get to you, you are required to send your NAME and ADDRESS to us for verification and after verification if truly you have sent money to Nigeria in the course of getting one fund or the other that means you have been scammed and you will be reimbursed with the sum of twenty thousand dollars only.

Twenty thousand dollars each will be transferred to every scam victims. The funds were deposited at Citibank Nigeria Limited (Citi Nigeria) by the Federal Government of Nigeria in care of Nigerian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to compensate every scam victims.The transfer will be handled by Citibank Nigeria Limited (Citi Nigeria) as instructed by the Federal Government of Nigeria so you do not need to pay any transfer fee or whatsoever and the funds have also been insured to avoid unnecessary deductions.

Send your name and address for verification to: [email protected]

***The means of verification is via Western Union and MoneyGram***

Please do not respond to email which asks you to send your username and password for any reason.

Please note that we have never held any scam victims compensation program in Nigeria. This is the First-Of-Its-Kind. Do not be deceived!

Yours sincerely,
Miss. Eyonu Caleb (Public Relations Officer)
Oversea Communication Department
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA), Nigeria
========================================================
We sincerely apologies for all the damages you must have gone through in the hand of Nigerian fraudsters. We are Projecting favorably the image of the government and people of Nigeria locally and internationally through a proactive mechanism (in line with global best practices) of informing, enlightening and educating Nigerians and the International Community about Nigeria.
========================================================

So this particular scam is based on a fake apology for people who have fallen for actual Nigerian scams. My favorite part is the Hotmail address supposedly in use by the Nigerian government for this “new program.” This scam only solicits name and address, although the future means of “verifying” whether or not you’ve been scammed before is suspect. I’m sure that giving these people your contact information will forever have you put on their Sucker List, and you will forever be receiving various attempts to scam you out of your money.

The bad English makes me twitch, too."
:ymtongue:
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Re: My scammer

Post by Saul » Mon May 14, 2012 11:20 am

Not only is it highly amusing that they are using a hotmail address but you can see where the scam is when they say
***The means of verification is via Western Union and MoneyGram***
Now what, can you imagine will be the "means of verification"? Yes, you will be asked to send a "small" amount just to verify who you are and that you are legitimate.

It's like those competition winning letters people get sent in the post where they are informed they have one a prize and they just need to phone a certain (premium rate) number with the code shown on the letter to find out what prize they have won. Of course the cost of the call is ten times what the prize is valued at but people never seem to read the small print.

If you are daft enough to not understand that the Nigerian government have no idea if you have been scammed or not and certainly are not going to ascertain that simply by you giving them your email address and sending some money via the scammers best friends, Western Union and Moneygram then yes I feel sorry for you but honestly, you need to get your head out of the clouds and start paying more attention to what you are being asked to do! THINK! as Peter said, this is supposed to be the Nigerian Government and they are using a FREE Hotmail address???
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 15, 2012 3:13 pm

Well here is a very interesting article for all to take a look at from globalpost.com. I am certain this will indeed interest Saul very much as well:
:-B

"Who's behind those Nigerian email scams?

Welcome to the Lagos suburb of Festac Town, the den of internet fraud.
Eamon Kircher-Allen July 21, 2009 06:33. Updated May 30, 2010 13:01

LAGOS, Nigeria — Remember that Nigerian prince who contacted you a few months back, saying he’d pay you to help transfer his inheritance to the United States?

All he needed was your bank account details, and you’d be well on the way to riches — or at least on the way to seeing your riches siphoned off to an enterprising Nigerian.

Chances are that email was sent from a console somewhere in Festac Town, a quiet, ramshackle suburb of Lagos, Nigeria. Here, a cluster of net cafes are rumored in Lagos’ press to be some of the last holdouts against a Nigerian federal crackdown on the country’s email scammers.

In the last two years, the Electronic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) of Nigeria has been putting scammers in jail. The commission has invited journalists on a successful high-profile operation to apprehend a scamming ring and has helped foil Nigerian-led groups that ran multimillion-dollar fraud schemes. In a 2007 report, the EFCC said it handled more than 18,000 advanced-fee fraud cases, a six-fold increase in just four years.

Now, even the net cafes in Festac are feeling the heat.

Festac Town was once a posh, park-lined suburb of low apartment buildings that the Nigerian government built in 1977, during the country’s first oil boom, to house participants in the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. The festival drew tens of thousands from around the world, and Festac remained an upscale, desirable neighborhood until the 1980s.

But in the 1980s and 1990s, Festac deteriorated, and its wealthier residents left for newer neighborhoods. Soon it was flooded with educated, jobless youths hanging on to the bottom edge of Lagos’s middle class. These young people now populate the internet cafes. Like Festac Town’s apartment buildings, they were made for a future of far more promise.

One cafe, Steadylink Communication, is a dimly lit, third-floor place with unfinished plywood cubicles. Signs on the walls warn that the EFCC is watching. Some customers look rankled by the presence of a foreigner with a notepad.

But while the EFCC efforts may be making people jumpy, they haven’t stopped the scammers. The Internet Crime and Complaint Center (IC3), a U.S. federal body that tracks crime on the web, actually reported an increase last year in the percentage of internet crimes in the United States perpetrated by Nigerians. For years, the IC3 has ranked Nigeria as the No. 3 source of internet crimes in the world, behind the United States and the United Kingdom. But internet penetration in Nigeria is less than 7 percent. That means Nigerian scammers are particularly prolific.

Cons prey not only on victims’ naivete but also their greed — common scams include a request to facilitate a bank transfer of ill-gotten money. With a global pool to fish from, scammers only need a tiny percentage of people to take the bait.

The EFCC may not have stopped these scams, but the campaign has made a strong impression on cafe owners. Prince Kenneth Okonedo, the managing director of Steadylink, sounds like he’s answered questions about scams before.

Okonendo says that the telltale sign of a scammer at work is that a vast amount of similar, template text will pass through the cafe’s ISP — an indication of bulk spamming.

“If we catch someone doing illegal things on their computers, we kick them out,” he said. “If they come back, then we don’t serve them, because we know their face.”

“There is always someone stubborn,” he added with a smile. “If that happens, we can call troops to come and take them.” He said he has taken those measures a couple of times, though he can’t describe a specific instance.

Next door to Steadylink is the more upscale King’s Net Cafe. Natural light floods the room from three sides, there’s a pool table in one corner and an employee wearing a blue polo emblazoned with the cafe’s name serves soft drinks. The clientele — almost entirely young men — chat, surf and shoot eight ball.

Manager Ope Loye laughs sheepishly when asked if he knows the hit Nigerian rap tune “Yahooze,” in which singer Olu Maintain celebrates the high-rolling life of an email scammer. Loye says hardly anyone tries to scam at his cafe.

“Once they come in, we start monitoring, and if they are doing anything with cut and paste or anything like that, we ask them to leave.”

Still, it’s easy to imagine that some of the young men at the cafe might have a hard time resisting temptation. No matter how much the EFCC clamps down, the underlying causes of the scam epidemic remain. Nigeria boasts a huge pool of relatively well educated, jobless youth.

Ayo Olagunju, a software designer and financial analyst who grew up in Festac, would like to see government programs that help young scammers become legitimate entrepreneurs. He says internet crime is just as damaging to Nigeria as it is to naive foreign victims.

“I’m in the financial industry, and a deal I should just talk through over dinner, you have to word it and get lawyers to convince them you’re not fake,” he said. “It’s affecting people who are genuine.”
:-?
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 15, 2012 3:37 pm

Also for Saul and happyhippycaz although the article above paints the picture that the Nigerian government is doing something it does not mean that they have been free from their own scam involvement in Nigerian scams as well which can be a reason why they have not been effective enough in completely wiping out this scourge and plague. The site known as home.rica.net which is the Nigeria - The 419 Coalition Website clearly shows that the Nigerian government has had their hand in the cookie jar. The post may be old but still has a point: :-?


"BRIEF PROOFS OF NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT INVOLVEMENT IN THE NIGERIAN SCAM COURTESY OF THE 419 COALITION
[This is a 1997 Document]

1. One Coalition associate's Scammers presented themselves as high officials of the Central Bank of Nigeria. Our associate was able to ask for by name and speak with the Scammers at CBN - THE PHONE NUMBER FOR CBN OBTAINED FROM LAGOS DIRECTORY ASSISTANCE AND NOT FROM THE SCAMMERS.

2. One Coalition associate's Scammers also presented themselves as high officials of the CBN. Our associate was actually TAKEN INTO the vault of CBN by his Scammers and shown the money available for the "proposal". He was able later to pick his Scammers out of a photo lineup in the US which included authenticated high officials of CBN.

3. One Coalition associate met with Nigerian Diplomatic Corps personnel at Nigerian Consulate facilities in California, both the personnel and the facilities verifiable and a matter of public record, to vet the "proposal" with them. He subsequently lost $75,000.00 plus.

4. One Coalition associate had his Scammers investigated privately in Lagos. They were known at CBN by name as CBN high officials; the home address of the primary Scammers was checked out, including photographs and confirmation of identity by neighboring residents; the primary Scammer signed for "in person" DHL deliveries at the verified home address. All this data and more was turned over to the Nigerian Government. They did nothing.

5. In order to "prove" that they were doing something about the Scam, the Nigerian Consulate in New York issued an official document letterheaded "Presidential Task Force on Trade Malpratices" (sic) which claimed that arrests had been made in a given case. However, when the Scammee was checked with, he stated that those claims were baseless and that nothing had been done. In short, the Nigerian Government lied outright in a document issued through official channels.

6. In the Nigerian Government's White Paper on the Scam, it states that owners of the fax numbers from which Scam documents come will be severely punished. However, there have been VERY FEW, if any such arrests which are INDEPENDENTLY verifiable. The Nigerian Government claims it cannot find the owners of the numbers... wonder how the phone Company in Lagos ever manages to bill?

7. CBN denies involvement in the Scam, taking out ads repeatedly in the international media stating same. Of course, Anybody can buy an ad and say anything they want in it. Now - common sense - doesn't do any good stealing money if one doesn't get to spend it, and the top Scammers stay in Nigeria where they are protected.

It is required by law that all Money Transfers of over $10,000 to financial institutions in Nigeria be reported to CBN. These reports must include the name and address of both the sender and receiver of these funds. Transfers of $100,000 or more require the customer on the Nigerian end to present an authentic document bearing his picture in addition to the above and all such transactions must be cleared and initialled by a CBN officer.

It is also required that Nigerian financial institutions report ANY transaction of over N500,000 for individuals and N2,000,000 for corporations etc. to the Nigerian Authorities ( NDLEA etc. ).

Yet CBN and the Nigerian Authorities just cannot Find the recipients of these funds when called upon to do so, and monies returned to victims by actions of the Nigerian Governement remain, given the magnitude of the Nigerian Scam, miniscule.

Go Figure :) :) Anybody can buy an ad :) :)"
:-? :-B

Note: To happyhippycaz you said you found some additional information such as an IP address, an email address belonging to the scammer, and letters sent to you by them. Please feel free to post EVERYTHING (just remove your name and email from the letters when posting them). Every available piece of information helps especially in tracking down these scammers so they can be stopped. I am certain that Saul will not object to this at all plus you will be saving another person from becoming a victim of a scammer. Think about it. Food for thought. :-?
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Sat May 26, 2012 9:58 am

Here is a very sad story of what an Army scammer did to a woman in Australia and this comes from the site known as the dangersofinternetdating.blogspot.com. This story shows you the dangers in playing around with these crooks: :-? :-B :( :((

Friday, August 7, 2009
Scammer on Match.com
another nigerian scammer story

I am a mid forties woman living in Melbourne and have been on Match.com searching for a partner. I am a single Mum with a small child and a 21 y.o. Autistic boy.
In early February 2009 a man by the name of Tyon Gates ([email protected] sent me an email telling me how beautiful I was and that he wanted to get to know me . ..that he could not believe he had met such an angel as me. ..
I was hooked into his charm. He soon removed his profile from the dating site and we were chatting frequently on yahoo messenger (which he helped me set up!) I soon gave him my number and he began ringing me frequently calling me “Sweetie,Honey” etc. He told me that he soon was telling me that he wanted me off the MATCH web site.
When we spoke he was very difficult to understand but I fobbed it off as he told me his Dad was American Indian and his Mum Italian. Tyon claimed to come from Texas but was currently in London on business. He was an importer of antiques allegedly!
HE then told me that he had to go to Nigeria to buy antiques and would call me when he got there.
He gave me his direct number to his room in Lagos and we spoke regularly, but mostly chatted on Yahoo messenger.
He told me he had been out shopping for antiques and sent me the invoice with my name on the top with him “Mr and Mrs Tyon and Sandra Gates”. Telling me that I will be a part of his life and that he wants to spoil me – take care of me and that he will be very wealthy once he sells his wares back in the US. Tyons spelling was poor and I tested him with some basic Italian phrases which he failed. (His mother apparently is Italian living in Italy)
Tyon kept telling me how great our life would be together and how much he would love and take care of me. Tyon’s accent I could not distinguish – it did not sound Nigerian at all!)
Then one evening while we were chatting he told me that he had just got the=2 0tax certificate from the Nigerian government and the tax on his goods was much more than he anticipated. He asked me to help him by sending him money. I told him I did not have it to send but he insisted and kept at me and got quite agitated at times that I would not help him when he needed me most! He kept assuring me that he would pay me back and that he was going to make me very happy! He asked me my ring size and said that he had bought me a ring.
I relented and sent him AUD$1400.00. .. HE was so grateful and kept telling me how much he loved me. He sent me flowers and chocolates..
He assured me that he would not ask me for anymore money but then his friend was talking to me and asked me to help him with more money so Tyon could leave and come to me. I was very angry and wrote Tyon an angry email..
Somehow he seemed to bring me round with his charm and also was very manipulative in his convincing me that he just needs a bit more money. I sent a subsequent AUD$700.00 dollars to him. And he again was so loving and grateful. He sent me his itinerary of his intent to travel to Australia to meet me. Then later asked me to help him with a little more money.. I kept telling him I did not have it and could not meet my rent payments or buy food. HE told me I was lying about that!
Through his pleading and demands I sent another AUD$650.00. HE assured me that this would the last and that he could not wait to see me!
He told me that he was checking out of the hotel on the Tuesday morning and scheduled to fly out of Lagos that evening. The last time he called me he said he was at the bank picking up the last money I sent and that he loved me very much! He asked me what I was going to cook for him. He would always ask me how “our” boys were.
On the Wednesday evening I received a phone call from someone with an accent telling me that Tyon had been in an accident on the way to the airport. They asked me if I was his wife. They spoke a little about the accident and said he was in a coma. I asked them for information about what hospital he was in. They then rang me back about half an hour later and told me they needed $50,000 in Nigerian currency before they could operate. This alleged doctor said he would give me his office number but I insisted on knowing what hospital Tyon was in. They hung up (bad line!) then called back again. I asked again what hospital but they were being very evasive. I told them to ring his family for help. I hung up the phone. They kept trying to ring me so I pulled the phone out of the wall. I was feeling bad as I could not understand what was going on and that if in fact he was in hospital, then I ought to be helping!
I tried ringing hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria but could not get through. I wrote emails to the email address that apparently organised his flights. I looked up the air France website and typed in his booking details and came up with nothing.
I feel very concerned as this man has my address and my phone numbers."
:(( :(
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Re: My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Thu May 31, 2012 10:51 am

Sorry I took so long coming back. I traced the IP address to Massey Street, Lagos, Nigeria. The IP address number is 41.206.11.9 and it comes up with a 'known scammer' warning when you type in the IP address on Scam Email Parser. This is what it says :-

41.206.11.9 NIGERIA Known Scammer

Scammer Found ! (ID: 39778)
IP Block 41.206.11.9 (Frequent Scammer)
Country Lagos, Nigeria
Comments PR 29584 (701366272 - 701374463) MTN Nigeria
Abuse Email

He is still using the email [email protected]

I have managed to join a website group on Facebook and found an anti-scam group on there I sent them all his pictures and details and now his Tagged account comes up with a scammer warning, and warning he is a military imposter.
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Thu May 31, 2012 3:08 pm

Points to Remember: :-? :-B

Thank you so much for coming back and helping others today because it seems since you posted this that it has been getting some attention. It is greatly appreciated what you have done today-thank you again. :) A genuine military person (for example from the United States) will have several things:

1. Their location is not found in Africa or an African country.

2. They will be able to give you their Military E-mail address. The E-mail address: [email protected] is very funny by the way. The name "sgtseymour" sounds like it came from a movie or from a cartoon. :)) Honestly, this is another sign that you can check. Look for odd-looking or strange-looking E-mail addresses.

3. They will not ask you for money. Remember if they are genuine they will be getting a salary from the military and therefore have money that is available to be spent.


Note: However, I do not understand what all the fuss is with women who are seeking after "Army type men." This is why they are falling sometimes for these Army scams and it is the truth that must be spoken of here. I believe it is because they are fascinated by what they believe "heroism" is and the fantasy about such that they have in their minds. I must ask the question: Cannot a man who is not from the Army or with a military background be a hero just like a man from the military? A good man ladies is not always found in the Army-Remember that well. :-? :)
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Re: My scammer

Post by happyhippycaz » Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:18 am

Hi to be quite honest with you I wasn't looking for a soldier. He claimed to have met me on smooch.com and sent me a friend request on Facebook. This dating site is just a normal one and to be honest I didn't even like soldiers or their uniform, guess I fell for it because I thought a soldier is someone who you can trust. But I was only on the dating site to meet a normal man.
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Re: My scammer

Post by TheTruthTeller » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:21 pm

No Problem: Extra Understanding! ;)

I completely understand you but for those ladies whose "fantasies" are soldiers they have to be told the Truth otherwise they more than likely will fall for an Army Scam and a Military Dating Scammer because these scammers love to play upon the minds of their intended victims especially women by creating a fantasy in their minds.

As a man I am (1) a very decent man (2) not disrespectful to ladies or women but (3) not in the Military or in the Army. I also know what it is to be the victim of dating scams (twice) and so I know how victims can feel after they have been scammed and believe me the feeling is a most horrible one to experience. :(( :( This is the reason why I fight scammers like these today. :)

The information you have given can hopefully (A) help other women avoid such a horrible experience as well as (B) avoid the horrible feelings that come afterwards.

Thank you again for all you have shared
.
:)
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