Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turkey

In order for any information about scammers to be useful, it needs to be brought to public attention as soon as available. That's what this section is for. Post scammers or "suspect" scammers here...before they get away with scamming someone else!

Moderators: HH, Saul, Sasha

User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turkey

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 2:56 am

This subject shall deal with the corruption and scam elements that are in Turkey. It has long been known that Turkey is in fact full of corruption, fraud, and scams (though not with everyone of course).

It does not mean that the whole country is bad let me clearly say but it does mean there is a plague in the country and this topic shall both explore it and expose it as well. This fact is proven from the site known as euractiv.com which says this and I quote:
:-? :-B

"Corruption hurts Turkey most
Published 10 September 2008

"The fact that Turkey lags so far behind when it comes to the fight against bribery and corruption seriously lowers Turkey's status before the EU," argues Zeynep Gögus, the president of Brussels-based NGO TR Plus Centre for Turkey in Europe and EurActiv Turkey's publisher, in an interview with Today’s Zaman, a Turkey-based English daily."
:-? :-B

The site known as papers.ssrn.com also adds this: :-? :-B

"Preventing Corruption in Turkey: Issues, Instruments and Institutions

Abstract:
The existence of corruption in Turkish political-bureaucratic system as a pervasive, entrenched, and enduring problem has long been an “open secret” for anybody involved even scantly in the public affairs of the country..."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 3:07 am

Turkish Corruption Issues: :-? :-B

Here is what the site known as todayszaman.com says:

"Turkey’s fraud and corruption rate twice world average

...The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) notes that the world average for fraud in organizations is calculated at 7 percent of total turnover, whereas this figure is about 15 percent in Turkey. Despite various anti-fraud laws that have been passed in Turkey and significant attempts to create more a ethical culture in organizations, fraud continues to be an inevitable and unpleasant component of modern life....

....To understand the importance of real-life fraudulent activities, forensic accountant Muhsin Bilgi shared with Sunday’s Zaman an example of a fraud case that his company, Muhsin Bilgi Audit Services, uncovered involving a store selling the licensed products of a famous football club. “By a very simple technique at the cash register the management and employees of the store had undeservedly earned TL 180,000. Another example involved a hotel’s human resource manager, who had indicated there were 900 employees on staff when there were only 800 people working there. As an outcome of this fraud in staffing numbers, the hotel had suffered monthly losses of TL 70,000,” he said.

There are six types of fraud, namely internal and external company fraud, employee fraud, management fraud, investment fraud, customer fraud and vendor fraud. For example, fraud can occur in the form of embezzling funds, not registering funds received or underreporting funds received in the company’s registries. Another example can be as simple as providing a generous discount to a customer without having the authorization to do so. False claims made to medical insurers for injuries or ailments that the claimant does not have is also an example of fraud.

One of the most dangerous forms of fraud for an organization is when the fraud is committed in the name of the company. Examples include misleading claims about products, offering returns on investment that can never be realized or falsifying financial statements to mislead analysts and investors. When these kinds of fraud and corruption are made public, this can lead to the bankruptcy of a company and the resignations or arrests of top executives. It can also lead to the depreciation of shares and the collapse in the market value of a company.

The Deloitte report “Corporate Resiliency: Managing the Growing Risk of Fraud and Corruption” states that “[f]raud itself cannot be eradicated, but fraud and corruption risks can be managed like other business risks.”

Bilgi told Sunday’s Zaman that this view is correct since fraud and corruption will always exist where there are money and people. “The most important point here is to minimize these unethical activities by increasing the controls and supervision in an organization. Therefore the role of fraud auditors is very important. While normal auditors focus on whether the company’s payments, bills, invoices, etc., are in line with the rules of accounting, forensic accountants look at whether there are any signs of fraud or corruption in these bills and invoices. Small or large, the amount is not important for us,” Bilgi said.

Erol Demirel, an independent accountant, told Sunday’s Zaman that he disagrees with this view, saying that giving priority to preventing informal economies will in itself address fraud and corruption in Turkey. “For instance, there are many people who have witnessed or been party to serious fraudulent activities. However, as they are in receipt of unregistered earnings, they are unable to lodge a complaint because of the fear that their own fraud will also be exposed,” Demirel stated. “I believe that reducing informal economies and increasing internal auditing within companies will solve this problem,” he said.

Even though companies have implemented several regulations to address fraud and corruption, there are those who say that hiring employees who show more respect for religious or ethical values could effectively decrease this rate. Demirel noted that employing people with stronger ethical values could have an impact on the rate of fraud and corruption but that a greater influence on fraud in companies is the financial problems faced by individuals. Bilgi argues that is crucial to hire suitable staff but says that this factor in itself will not be enough to prevent fraud and corruption. “Nobody is perfect. If a certain person wants to earn more money or has problems such as a drinking or drug habit, they are more likely to become involved in fraud or corruption. According to one US-based survey, 10 percent of employees said they were involved in fraud on a regular basis. In the same report 75 percent of people responded that they would act fraudulently if given the opportunity."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 3:18 am

More about Turkish Corruption comes to us from the site known as globalsecurity.org which says this and I quote: :-? :-B

"Turkey - Corruption

Corruption is perceived to be a problem in Turkey by private enterprise and the public at large, particularly in government procurement. American companies operating in Turkey have complained about being solicited, with varying degrees of pressure, by municipal or local authorities for "contributions to the community". Parliament continues to probe corruption allegations involving senior officials in previous governments, particularly in connection with energy projects.

Public procurement reforms were designed to make procurement more transparent and less susceptible to political interference, including through the establishment of an independent public procurement board with the power to void contracts. With regard to the WTO Government Procurement Agreement, Turkey is not yet a signatory, although it has maintained observer status for over a decade. The judicial system is also perceived to be susceptible to external influence and to be biased against outsiders to some degree..."
:-?
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 3:29 am

Here is more about the corruption issues of Turkey from the site known as the hurriyetdailynews.com: :-? :-B

"Bribery common and acceptable in Turkey, research finds

ISTANBUL - Hürriyet Daily News | 5/31/2011 12:00:00 AM |

Bribery and corruption are still widespread in Turkey because there is little enforcement of anti-fraud legislation, according to an executive at Ernst & Young’s regional branch.

“While companies are making progress in strengthening their ethical culture, a significant portion of Turks responding to a [recent] survey still consider it acceptable to pay bribes to win or retain business,” Dilek Çilingir, head of Ernst & Young’s Fraud Investigation & Dispute Services in Central and Southeastern Europe, said at an Istanbul meeting Tuesday while revealing the results of the European Fraud Survey.

Some 77 percent of Turkish employees think that bribery and fraud is common in Turkey, she said.

“Businesses in general need strong corporate cultures to fight the risks of fraud, bribery and corruption – a culture which, by necessity, must start from the top of the organization,” said Çilingir.

However, the survey suggests that a significant minority in businesses are still prepared to do “whatever it takes” to help their business survive and grow – including issuing bribes.

Some 37 percent of the respondents in Turkey approve of bribery to allow businesses to become successful; this rate is much lower in other countries at 10 percent in Germany, 13 percent in the United Kingdom, 19 percent as a whole in Europe and 23 percent in Spain.

Some 29 percent of the Turkish respondents reported that they accepted personal gifts to retain business whereas this rate was 17 percent in Europe, the research found.

According to the survey, many companies have a long way to go in addressing the challenges of fraud and corruption.

Some 105 employees in Turkey responded to the questions, while another 2,255 employees in 24 other European countries also participated in the survey."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:03 am

Here again is another interesting article on the subject of corruption in Turkey that comes from the site known as todayszaman.com: :-? :-B

"Turkey struggles to fight corruption

31 August 2008 / ERCAN YAVUZ, ANKARA

In its Third National Program, Turkey has pledged to make comprehensive amendments to the Turkish Penal Code (TCK), the Code on Criminal Procedure (CMK), and the Law of Misdemeanors in an effort to fight corruption and to establish a parliamentary political ethics commission to bring transparency to political financing.

Although these commitments are made as part of advancing the country's EU bid, Turkey's report card for fighting corruption and fraud is not good, despite relative improvements in recent years. With Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu, the deputy chairman of the Republican People's Party (CHP), accusing Şaban Dişli, the deputy chairman of the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party), of $1 million worth of corruption, Turkey has once again faced the bitter truth of the corrupt practices prevalent throughout the country.

Will a Turkey that promises the EU to amend 131 laws be able to completely rid itself of a social disease as ingrained as corruption? Experts say while it has recently made significant progress in this respect, Turkey will continue to see claims of corruption being made against all governments even if radical changes are introduced to the auditing system. Yes, but what is the solution?

Mustafa Özyürek, a former field auditor and the general accountant and İstanbul deputy for the CHP, thinks that unless the auditing system is reformed, corruption cannot be prevented.

He noted that audits in Turkey are performed by the inspection boards of the public institutions, the Higher Inspection Board (YDK), the Presidential Public Inspection Board (DDK) and the Supreme Court of Accounts. "The inspection boards are dysfunctional. Governments are audited by the people that they appoint. An inspector is expected to inspect a minister, undersecretary, deputy undersecretary or general manager. Such an inspection does not produce reliable results. Suppose that inspection has been conducted properly. If, during this inspection, an irregularity is found, the minister decides whether it should be prosecuted or not. For this reason, corrupt practices performed in the current period cannot be identified. Only those performed in the term of the previous government can be found," he said.

Özyürek believes that the YDK and the DDK are problematical organizations. "Turkey should ensure the autonomy of its auditing mechanisms. Otherwise, we cannot prevent fraud and corruption," he noted.

Özyürek pointed out that the audit system in place in Turkey is considerably defective in terms of detecting corrupt practices and that this is further aggravated by the failure of local administrations to abide by principles of transparency.

He asserts that changes to municipal development plans are not made transparently and that it is similarly hard to expect municipal councils to make their decisions in a transparent manner. He added that while the Public Procurement Authority (KİK) was established upon pressures from the EU, it is not given the authority to manage public tenders, as the government tends to insert the exception that says, "This law is exempt from the provisions of the public procurement law" into every new piece of legislation.

"We, as the CHP, will propose an independent and autonomous audit system, as currently charges of corruption cannot be properly prosecuted due to a defective expert opinion system," he said. He argues that, given this picture, the corrupt practices that come to light are only the ones that are discovered accidentally or are due to a disagreement over the sharing of corrupt income among accomplices. He acknowledged that the CHP has discovered the corruption claims about the Turkish Petroleum Refineries Corporation (TÜPRAŞ) and Dişli only incidentally. He added that the CHP will concentrate its efforts on the corrupt practices of the AK Party.

Ergüven: A national audit board is needed

Public Auditors Association (DENETDE) President Atılay Ergüven sees a lack of resolve by the government as the most important reason for Turkey's failure to uproot corruption.

Ergüven, a former inspector at the Health Ministry, was removed from office due to, he claims, his fight against corruption. He said although the court ordered his reappointment to his former office, the ministry has failed to abide by the court order. He highlights that political parties tend to make outrageous commitments concerning the fight against corruption, which they fail to keep afterwards.

"Governments just pretend to prevent corruption. Symbolic corruption cases are offered to create sensation or big impact while large-scale corrupt practices are conducted behind the scenes," he said.

Noting that the current auditing system in Turkey cannot produce reliable results, he indicated: "The state and bureaucracy are involved in some part of all corruption cases in Turkey. Governments tolerate the bureaucrats appointed by them when they are accused of corruption. Lack of a proper registration system nurtures corruption and vice versa."

Ergüven explained that they have prepared a draft bill concerning the establishment of a national audit board which would enable independent auditing as in the US and the EU; he said they have submitted it to former presidents, and that they intend to give it also to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, although he has consistently refused to give an appointment to them.

"Auditing should not be left to the whims of politicians or bureaucrats. This government wants to eliminate even the inspection boards. Cases of corruption are accidentally uncovered. This is just the tip of the iceberg," he argued.

According to a report published by the World Bank on June 26, 2008, Turkey showed considerable progress with respect to accountability and the fight against corruption in 2007 compared to 1996.

According to the bank's 2008 Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGI) report, Turkey's percentile rank for the category of freedom of speech and accountability, one of the six key governance indicators used in the research, rose to 41.8 percent, up from 34.0 in 1996. Turkey's percentile rank in the control of corruption category rose from 57.8 to 59.4 in 2007. The indicator measuring political instability and violence rose to 20.7 last year from 8.7 in 1996. However, the supremacy of the rule of law fell to 53.3 from 55.2 in the same period.

According to the World Bank report, many developing country governments including Turkey are making important gains in the control of corruption. Political and institutional reforms are empowering Turkey in its fight against corruption, the report says. The strengthening of the DDK and the law on access to information, passed in 2003, that allowed citizens to seek information from public institutions are listed as important actions in the fight against corruption.

According the 10th Global Corruption Survey conducted on Aug. 12, 2008, by Ernst & Young, an auditing and counseling firm, 68 percent of executives of international firms surveyed believe that measures against bribery and corruption are not sufficiently strong in Turkey.

The survey, conducted with the participation of 1,186 top executives from 33 countries, showed that there is a rising awareness against bribery and this has encouraged international organizations, including the UN, to draft important anti-bribery agreements.

The participants noted that anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws in Turkey have been made stronger, although existing sanctions and public pressures are behind the worldwide average.

This implies that legal sanctions cannot be properly implemented in Turkey. However, compared to previous periods, the anti-bribery laws have become stronger in the last five years, the survey found.

According to the survey, the rate of success by internal audits in detecting and preventing bribery and corruption is 72 percent worldwide, but 52 percent in Turkey. On the other hand, 52 percent of executives in Turkey believe that auditors are sufficiently informed about bribery, corruption, risks and indicators.

Recently, European Parliament member Frank Vanhecke, in noting that a working group of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) had expressed serious concerns about Turkey's implementation of the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions, asked EU Enlargement Commissioner Olli Rehn whether Turkey, a party to the convention since 2000, had failed to implement its standards.

Rehn responded: "The commission attaches great importance to Turkey's anti-corruption policies. A new project titled the Ethical Project for Prevention of Corruption is being implemented in Turkey. Under this project, public institutions, local authorities, nongovernmental organizations and universities will work together in order to promote an ethical culture not only centrally, but also throughout rural Turkey."

In the Corruption Perceptions Index published by Transparency International in early 2007, it was noted that Turkey had made progress, moving from the 65th rank in 2005 to 60th in 2006.

The report stressed that while the corruption perception in the judicial system was relatively low in the first 60 years of the republic, it had started to rise over the last 20 years, which shows that the public is losing trust in the judicial system.

It further argued that the government's involvement in appointments of judges and prosecutors makes the judicial system vulnerable to political interventions and that judges and prosecutors may abuse their immunities. The report also listed the expert opinion mechanism in the Turkish judicial system as a backdoor for corrupt practices.

Reports prepared by experts tend to be false, misleading or wrong, while Turkish judges readily accept them as true without further inquiry, it noted."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:17 am

Scams in Turkey: :-B :-w

Before we go to talk more about the corruption that is in Turkey let us now talk about the scams in Turkey. Information about scams in Turkey comes to us from the site known as turkeycentral.com:


"Common Scams In Turkey
Started by Ken, Jan 28 2007 10:20 PM

"....Incirlik is a prime place for these scams. You'll find people in Incirlik who are friendly, hardworking, and honest. You'll find a lot of other types of people there too, and they are also friendly. Many of them have plans to develop relationships with US military members or contractors simply to get them to visit their shops. Others have more dishonest purposes in mind. Many of the scammers have spent their lives at Incirlik and have seen a lot come and go, and they've learned which approaches work and which ones don't, and have many years of experience with this kind of thing...I've also tried to help out people who were the victims of scams, so what I'm posting comes from that as well. I also lived in Incirlik village and made some very good friends, and was able to learn some of the things that go on behind the scenes. Now you will know some of it too...

SCAM 1: YOU'RE MY SPECIAL FRIEND. WHEN ARE YOU COMING TO MY SHOP?


When I was in Istanbul at a small hotel I met a Turk who used to work at some of the shops at Incirlik and he told me of one shop where three brothers divided up the responsibilities of running the shop. One spoke the best English of the three, so he was assigned the responsibility of befriending Americans for the sole purpose of getting more customers. What struck me is the planning and strategy involved in his assignment of making friends, and that it was actually part of their business plan. Friendship can also be used to get you to accept things which were made for you which are substandard, playing on your sympathies for Uncle Mehmet who stayed up all night for a week working on your furniture, and would be heartbroken if you didn't accept it. Don't fall for it. It's not uncommon to be presented with a substandard product after paying a deposit for it to be made. Stand your ground, play their game.

SCAM 2: THE SUDDEN EMERGENCY, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO?


Another scam is the "sudden emergency" which requires exactly the amount of money which you can get with a debit card from the automatic bank machine on the alley. This one involves more preparation and time invested, and works well with lonely people in certain bars in the Alley. They can work several different people at the same time in different stages.

Now, when you first arrive you'll find lots of people who are interested in you, most of that will be strictly from a sense of sincere hospitality, which the Turks are world-famous for. You'll have no problem making friends. But you may run into someone who will exploit a friendship later. Basically one of the Turks at the bar will always go out of his way to welcome you, talk with you, offer help on all manner of things, and generally be the nicest person you ever met. He'll show great interest in anything you have to say. At some point he may even borrow a small amount of money and pay it back after you've known him for a while. He'll talk about what a great person you are compared to other people he has met, and will always warn you to be careful because of so many dishonest people around (except for him of course).

Eventually, (after a couple of months) you'll walk into the club or bar and he'll be very worried, hanging his head, and appear to be very stressed. He'll say he doesn't want to burden you with his personal problems, but that he hasn't been able to pay his rent and he and his wife and children are about to be evicted. He has no where to turn and no way to get the money. Since you've had a few drinks already, they guy has been a friend to you, you're making the big bucks, and won't miss it anyway, you'll volunteer to help him out. He'll say that he just couldn't ask you to do that, and you'll end up insisting that he accept the money. He'll be grateful and promise to pay you back when he can (fat chance, sucker!!!). I fell for this once, but then asked around and found someone else who fell for the same story, from the same guy.

That person was fired after I talked with the new owner, who didn't want this kind of thing going on in his club. However some of the owners of these places will act enraged when they hear something like this, and "fire" the employee to keep from having pressure from the base or being put off limits. The employee will just go work elsewhere or disappear for several months and reappear again.

Certainly people have emergencies, but be aware of this scam. What I should have done is find out who his landlord is, and have someone who spoke fluent Turkish come with me to discuss it. Of course the man would have objected, saying he would be too embarrased, but it seems to me being embarrassed with his rent paid by someone else is better than being evicted. But then again, what's to say he couldn't strike a deal with the landlord and split the money? Things like this do happen!

SCAM 3: WANT TO MEET SOME RUSSIAN GIRLS?

Some men patrol the alley after about ten o'clock looking for single men who are drinking in the bars. They'll sit down and talk you up, then invite you to Adana to a place where lots of pretty girls are. The place he wants to take you is normally open until 6:00 AM when everything else is closed, and that sounds like a pretty good idea to a drunk GI or contractor. These places are called "pavions" or "gazinos," and always seem to have the word "club" associated with them. DON'T GO. One of two things might happen.

Case 1: You'll find yourself treated like a king to a floor show, a flower on the table, snacks, and lots of drinks. One of the workers will bring over pretty girls to sit with you, who are paid by the drink. They'll sit and chat with you as you buy their drinks. What you'll find out later is that your bill is incredibly high, I've seen people get billed $3,000 for this, and it's all legal! You might be charged up to 20 YTL or more for a drink, while the drink of your lovely new acquaintance is costing 50 YTL or more per drink. By the way, the flower rental costs you another $20 USD. You won't be allowed to leave until you pay, and if you have to go to an automatic bank machine, you'll be accompanied by one or two large men to make sure you get the money and come back. The girls at these clubs are not prostitutes per se, some of them have just had a hard time in their home countries and really need the money. Some, however, will have sex with a guest on her own time but it's not legal for these places to act as houses of prostitution. Anyway that's not the point of this post! Oh, and remember that nice guy that brought you there? Well, he doesn't have any money! Not yet, anyway, not until he receives his commission from the club he brought you to. So they'll expect you to pay for him as well.

Now you can go to one of these places and have a nice, although expensive, time. If you ask clearly first the price of the drinks, and the prices of a drink for one of the girls, they will tell you up front. And if you're sober enough to remember clearly how many you had and how many you bought, these places won't normally put up a fuss if you contest an over-billing. If they do, ask them to call the police for you and refuse to pay. They'll usually let you pay a fair bill and leave, but if you don't know the price of what you're buying, you don't stand a chance. I can almost guarantee they'll over-charge you just on the chance that you've forgotten how many you had and can't perform simple math at the moment!

Case 2: You'll be having a nice time with your friend, when he tells you to watch the floor show. You'll finish your drink, and that will be the last thing you clearly remember. You'll wake up the next day with him telling you what a wild man you were, how you bought drinks for everybody, and wanted to sit with or dance with all of the girls in the place. He'll tell you of his heroic efforts to stop you (but you wouldn't listen) and how you were very insulting and rude. He'll say anything to make you believe that the upcoming charges on your credit card were all your fault. The only thing you'll remember is this weird dream of being jostled around and standing in front of an automatic bank machine while being told repeatedly to enter your PIN number. Then before long you'll get your credit card statements and find thousands of dollars deducted from your account for charges at this club. What actually happened was that when you were watching the show and turned your head away, he put rohypnol (also called the date-rape drug) into your glass of raki or whatever else you were drinking. You were drugged.

The shame of this is that it happens to people and they don't report it, out of sheer embarrassment usually, but if you're restricted to Incirlik, you don't want to tell your commander that you were in Adana, so you pay the bill and forget it. So that makes it a great time to pull this scam. It is also a seasonal thing. Some of the people who do this may disappear for a while and then come back when there is a new commander on base and a new base population has rotated in.

SCAM 4: WANT A MASSAGE?

One club offers a massage in the back room. A great way to separate a drunk customer from his pants, which also contain his wallet. You'll go into a room where this massage is to take place, and disrobe, only to be taken to an adjoining room where you receive your massage, while one of the workers receives your wallet, and your credit cards. This is great for TDY people whose flight out of Incirlik comes before their credit card statement comes in. Now, there are places at Incirlik which offer massages that from what I know are honest businesses. This particular incident happened at a club that offered them as an additional attraction.

What many people don't know is that you can get your money back from the credit card company. You need to file a complaint immediately, and they will send you copies of the receipts. You'll probably immediately recognize that the signature is not yours. The credit card company can handle this for you and take out their wrath on the club where it happened. Of course, the owner will be enraged and will immediately fire the worker, who will be working there again in about six months.

SCAM 5: A BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP!

You'll run into people who want you to become a partner in their club or establishment. What they want is your money, not you. 'nuff said about that!

SCAM 6: WE CAN DO, AGABE (MY OLDER BROTHER)!

This isn't really a scam, more of an annoyance than anything. If you have a custom-tailored suit made, or some furniture, you MAY find that the maker will give you assurances that the product will be according to your specifications. Some of them can make furniture from a photo in a furniture catalogue, and some of these shops are quite good at what they do. However some may deliver, then try to pass off substandard work and play on your sympathies about accepting it, bringing up poor old uncle Mehmet and how hard he worked on it to feed his family. They will ask for a deposit, I have even been pestered to pay more money while a suit was being made. Is that a scam? You decide.

SCAM 7: COMMISSIONS, COMMISSIONS.

Again, not necessarily a scam, but worth mention. Everybody at Incirlik seems to work on commission for bringing business to somebody else. Whether you need a place to stay, a rental car, or a left-handed smoke shifter, just about anybody there will help you find one, and will expect a commission from the place they take you. As a result, you may not be taken to the best place for what you need. So if your waiter says he can get you a house, then he should be working at a real estate agency rather than at a restaurant. I once had a metal safe box which I though contained an important paper. I needed somebody to cut a hole in it big enough to see what was in there. I asked someone on the alley where there was a place which could do that. He got on his cell phone and made a call, later two men on a motor scooter pulled up. One got off, and I rode the motorbike into some house in the bowels of Incirlik village, only to sit and watch two guys banging the hell out of the box with a claw hammer and screwdriver for about 30 minutes, while two combined families looked on, perhaps expecting some treasure to be inside. After several glasses of tea accompanied by constant banging and occasional swearing, they opened it. The only thing inside was a little user's manual and warranty. After my bike ride back to the alley, I paid the promised 15 YTL to open the box, but then the driver of the motorbike, the passenger who stayed at the shop in the alley, and the guy with the claw hammer and screwdriver all wanted commissions. From me! So I got the double whammy of the "we can do agabe" and the commission thing at the same time."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:24 am

Here is another scam found in Turkey. Information about this scam comes to us from the site known as turkeytravelplanner.com: :-? :-B

"VAT Refund Scam in Turkey

You're out shopping anywhere in Turkey (particularly in a carpet shop). You find something you like. The price is suitable, or you haggle (or bargain) until it is suitable. You decide to buy. Good!

The salesperson says "I must charge you Value-Added Tax" (KDV in Turkish) "but you can obtain a tax refund at the airport when you take your purchase out of Turkey."

Even better! Tax-free shopping! When it works, it's great: at the airport you apply to a tax refund office in the terminal before you go through passport control. You show them your purchase receipt, fill in a form, and they pay you the tax refund.

But often it does not work, and here's why. The salesperson may tell you that the tax is refundable at the airport, but on your purchase receipt it may say that you have already received the refund directly from the shop.

You're out shopping anywhere in Turkey (particularly in a carpet shop). You find something you like. The price is suitable, or you haggle until it is suitable. You decide to buy. Good!

The salesperson says "I must charge you Value-Added Tax" (KDV in Turkish) "but you can obtain a tax refund at the airport when you take your purchase out of Turkey."

Even better! Tax-free shopping! When it works, it's great: at the airport you apply to a tax refund office in the terminal before you go through passport control. You show them your purchase receipt, fill in a form, and they pay you the tax refund.

But often it does not work, and here's why. The salesperson may tell you that the tax is refundable at the airport, but on your purchase receipt it may say that you have already received the refund directly from the shop."

Here is additional Information from the site known as scaminfo.org:

"...The salesperson asked you to sign the receipt ("for your tax refund"). You signed an unfamiliar form without reading it carefully. When you get to the airport and your refund request is refused, you have a closer look at the form and see a notice saying that by signing the form you've confirmed that you've already received your refund.

Never sign anything you do not understand."

VAT Tax Refund Scam -2-


Here's another tax refund scam reported by two...users:

"During our visit in Istanbul in the end of March [2010] we met a salesman.... He runs [a shop on Divan Yolu in Sultanahmet, Istanbul.] He sold us two leather jackets, promising that we should get a tax free sales refund in the airport.

"We expected to get the proper papers to bring to the customs, but he ensured us that his company sends all such papers in time to the customs there, so that we only had to ask for the stamped form in that office to get our money.

"We were not convinced, so we asked in our hotel and searched in the Internet about the regulations, and found that we had to get the papers from the shop and bring them ourselves.

"We returned to the shop and demanded the signed form. [The salesman] refused, and ensured us once again that there were new rules and showed us a bunch of papers for the customs, that he told us was to be delivered to the airport.

"Of course - nobody there had heard of a procedure like that, and the company was not known either. We had received a card from [the salesman] with his shop address, telephone number ... and a non-existing Internet site address. But we found a booklet containing addresses to all shops in Istanbul providing tax free refund service and pointing out that these have a special official Tax free refund sign.

"So beware, check out that this sign is visible and don´t trust shopkeepers assuring you that they take care of the paper works."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:29 am

Here is more information on scams in Turkey from the same site known as turkeytravelplanner.com: :-? :-B

"Robbery of Single Male Travelers

Single male travelers are targets for several sorts of scams that end in robbery.

One of these is the "Let's Have a Drink" Scam which results in your paying a drinks bill of hundreds or even thousands of dollars or euros. Here's how it works and how to avoid it:

In Istanbul, Sultanahmet Square, and Beyoğlu's İstiklal Caddesi and Cumhuriyet Caddesi are common places for this to happen.

While you wander around on your own in the evening, you're approached by a well-dressed man who speaks good English. He chats with you, then he suggests you have a drink together, and leads you to a bar or nightclub that's in on the scam. (He might lead you to a normal, innocent place first in order to gain your confidence, then afterwards go to the scam location.)

As soon as you sit down, women and perhaps other men also sit at your table and order drinks (usually, but not always, "champagne"). Sooner or later the bill will come, you will be expected to pay it, and it will equal or exceed the total amount of money you have with you; or your credit card will be forcibly taken and charged for a huge amount. Typical "bills" presented to victims are between TL1000 and TL10,000. (In fact, they will usually take all the money you have.)

If you protest the scam, you may be taken into a backroom "office" and beaten or even threatened with death until you agree to pay. You may also be forcibly taken to an ATM and ordered to take as much money as you can from it.

It's robbery, plain and simple, and in recent years it has gotten a lot rougher and more dangerous. According to a report published in Hürriyet, Turkey's largest-circulation newspaper, on June 26, 2008, Istanbul police staged coordinated raids on six nightclubs suspected of this activity and arrested over a hundred people including bar owners, employees and konsomatris (bar girls whose job it is to entertain customers with the aim of increasing their bills). The police seized weapons (including a Kalashnikov and pistols) and drugs as well.

According to the Hürriyet article, some police may have been part of the scam. If a victim reported the incident to police, the police might recover some of the money for the victim, perhaps half of it—which left the remaining half to pay the "well-dressed man" who speaks English, the club, and the police themselves. "Well-dressed men," called "translators" in the Hürriyet article, could earn TL4000 to TL5000 per month at this scam.

If the victim didn't go to the police, the gang kept all of the money.

Even in the best of circumstances, where the police are not in on the scam, the situation is against you: the nightclub owner may protest that you ran up a big bill, got drunk, caused a ruckus and didn't want to pay. It's his word against yours, and he speaks the local language and knows how to work the scam. He knows that few foreign travelers will go to the police, and that he may never be tried and convicted.

(If at some point the club owner offers to give some or all of your money back to you in exchange for avoiding the police, don't believe him! He's a crook! You will get no money back, whatever he says. Avoid any further dealings with him!)"
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:39 am

Here is another scam that occurs in Turkey and again the same site turkeytravelplanner.com gives us more information about it: :-? :-B

"New Traveling Companions Scam

Single male travelers are targets for....particularly nasty scams. Few travelers actually suffer from these scams, but of course if it happens to you, your chance of suffering is 100%.

One of these scams is "New Traveling Companions." It works like this: you're a young male traveling alone. At a bus or train terminal, cafe, restaurant, hotel or other place where travelers gather, you're approached by two or three young men, perhaps between 18 to 28 years old, perhaps of Middle Eastern or North African descent.

They strike up a conversation with you and ask where you're going. "Just by coincidence," they're going the same way. They decide to travel with you. They may even travel all the way across the country with you, and may suggest sharing a bus or a train sleeping car along the way, or a hotel room at your destination.

At some point they'll offer you some food, a drink, or even a stick of chewing gum laced with a quick-acting barbiturate, probably phenobarbital (Nembutal), a powerful fast-acting sedative ("downer") that is colorless, odorless and tasteless. Within seconds you're knocked out. Hours later you awake with a fierce headache to find your passport, wallet, camera and "new friends" long gone. They'll probably even take all your luggage from the bus, train or hotel. Or, they may even hustle you around town to ATMs and force you (in your drugged state) to withdraw money up to your daily limit. Bystanders may think you've just fallen asleep, or are ill.

Sometimes they'll even join you in eating or drinking, but for some reason the drugged food, drink or gum doesn't affect them.

Turks are quite hospitable, and offering food, drink, gum, sweets, etc. is an important part of Turkish hospitality. The scammers, who most often are not Turks, take advantage of this. Remember that hospitality is well satisfied if a friend merely pays for a drink or a meal. There is no need for the friend to serve you the food or drink personally. So if someone you meet orders teas all around, the waiter brings them, and the friend pays, you're probably alright. But if the friend insists on bringing your tea to the table, you should be suspicious. In short, it's good to think three times about accepting anything, from the hand of a stranger, that you may put in your mouth.

This scam needn't involve long-distance travel. They may meet you at your hotel. They walk around and see the sights with you, and at some point suggest getting away to a quiet place, away from the crowds. While you're sitting quietly they offer you a sip from a soda, or a cookie, etc. and it knocks you out. The food, drink, gum etc. they offer you may even be in a sealed package, but the drug can be injected through the seal with a syringe.

How to avoid this scam?


Be cautious with any new "friends," particularly (but not exclusively) those of Middle Eastern or North African descent or nationality. Try to take a photograph of your new "friends." If they discourage you, they probably have something to hide and want no photographic evidence. If they offer you anything to put in your mouth, don't take it. (One sip or nibble can cost you everything but the clothes you're wearing.) Say you're on a diet, or you're allergic to certain foods and must be very careful what you eat and drink; leave it untouched and watch their reaction; or "accidentally" drop it or otherwise spoil it. If it's gum, put it in your pocket "for later."

Eat and drink only from your own supplies, or those you purchase personally from the hand of a shopkeeper or cafe/restaurant waiter.

If they act insulted, get away from them as fast as possible. Look for a refuge likely to have police or security: a ticket office, bank, big hotel, transport terminal, etc. Even standing in front of a security camera may do the trick.

If they say they want to stay in a hotel with you, say that you're staying with friends. Get out of it somehow, even by going to the police or your consulate if necessary."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:48 am

Here is another type of scam in Turkey found on the site known as wittistanbul.com: :-? :-B

"Tips To Prevent Popular Istanbul Taxi Scams
by Luca T. Davis

Taking a taxi (taksi) in Istanbul is a cheap, easy and comfortable way of transportation. But with 20.000 taxis driving around town, only a fool would believe all drivers are honest. Luckily most of them are indeed fair, but there are a rising amount of cases where tourists get hustled while taking a taxi ride in Istanbul.

Here are the most popular Istanbul taxi scams, and how you can prevent them from happening to you.

Making the Taxi Ride Longer

Scam — This a very common trick pulled on tourist by taxi drivers all over the world, and Istanbul is no exception to the rule. As a tourist you don’t know the shortest way to your destination, so the taxi driver can easily make an extra tour around the block and spice up the bill. In case the tourist does know the way, he’ll come up with the excuse that there is a massive traffic jam on the usual route.
Solution — If you are indeed unfamiliar with the roads and/or don’t speak Turkish, there is unfortunately very little you can do to tell him what route to take. That’s why we came up with giving you an overview of Istanbul taxi fares to the most common tourist destinations. This will give you a nice indication on when to start arguing with the taxi driver and cut the bill he presents you.

The Turkish Lira Note Switch


Scam — For arguments sake, let’s assume the fare is 15 TL and you hand him a 50 TL note. Out of sight he switches the note with a 5 TL note he has ready, shows it to you and waits for you to hand him the ‘remaining’ 10 TL note. Where you expected to get change, you’re confused (since you’re not familiar with the money) and end up paying 60 TL for a 15 TL drive.
Solution — Always make sure you have plenty of small bank notes and even coins on you for taxi rides so you can hand the taxi driver the exact amount due. In case you do have to hand a bigger note and expect change, double check the value of the note before you hand it to the driver. Also, tipping a taxi driver is not a Turkish custom unless he helped you with (un)loading your luggage.

I Have No Change

Scam — Again, let’s assume the fair is 16 TL and you hand him a 20 TL bill. The driver seemingly looks a bit around in his cab. After a minute he comes up with only 1 TL in change, claiming he ran out of coins. This way he tries to ‘earn’ another 3 TL.
Solution — You have two options. If it’s only a few Turkish Liras, you can just let it go. Or, what I mostly do, just sit in the car and tell him to go change the note in a shop. You’d be surprised how quickly they all of a sudden come up with the exact change.

A Fixed Price Instead of Using The Meter


Scam — The driver suggests to agree on a price for the ride to your destination instead of using the taxi meter. He’ll argue you’re better off this way, because there is a lot of traffic, he’ll take a short cut and you’ll pay less. Why would he want to be so kind to you? He isn’t!
Solution — Always insist to use the meter! If he doesn’t want to use the meter, or even worse doesn’t have one, refuse the ride, get out and flag down another taxi. The same goes in case he claims half way the ride the meter breaks down. Just make him stop next to a police car, and get out. He won’t argue with you, trust me.

Taxi, Taxi? Follow Me!

Scam — There are about 19.000 official and licensed taxi drivers in Istanbul. Unfortunately, there are at least a similar amount of illegal, unlicensed or private taxi drivers. Some may offer better rates, the majority doesn’t!
Solution — Only take official taxis. Istanbul taxis are yellow, have a taksi sign on the roof, have a meter built in (newer ones have them integrated in the mirror) and show their affiliation with a taxi stand, airport, hotel, etc. painted on their doors. You can have the hotel call one for you, look for them at taxi stands or just flag them down on the street.

Night Versus Daytime

Scam — The taxi driver puts the taxi meter on night time (gece) during the day, or during the night. Either way, it’s not correct because the night time/daytime difference has been abolished!
Solution — Make sure the meter is always set to daytime (gündüz). These words should appear on the meter display at regular intervals. For the new, mirror integrated meters, the daytime code to look for is ’1′.

Unsafe Driving

This is not a scam, but some Istanbul taxi drivers think the city is one giant race track. Sure, they are very experienced drivers and want to serve as much customers in a day as possible. If you ever start feeling unsafe, just tell the driver yavaş (yavash), which means as much as ‘slow down’. Just repeat the word until the driver reaches a speed you feel comfortable with. If he doesn’t comply, just get out at the first opportunity you have."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:56 am

Here is another type of scam to look out for and the information about this comes from the site known as aph.com: :-? :-B

"Beware this health scam in Turkey

....According to Europ Assist. It alleges that tourists must be on their guard against being cheated by unscrupulous doctors or clinics in Turkey, claiming that it has identified “numerous” examples of what it claims was unnecessary medical treatments for minor problems which costs tourists and travel insurers thousands of pounds.

Instances experienced by Europ Assistance customers so far this year include:

Tourists who only wanted to buy a cheap over-the-counter medication being pressured into being driven to a clinic.

Some tourists alleged they felt pressurised by Doctors into signing for more treatment than they received. Whilst some Brits were being placed on trips that were totally unnecessary being put on drips when they were only experiencing minor health problems.

“We are shocked by the number of instances of unnecessary medical treatment, overcharging and pressure on customers occurring in some Turkish clinics this summer,” says Paul Everett, Sales and Marketing Director for Europ Assistance.

“The Turkish medical community are, in the most part, true professionals and we would never want to discourage travellers from visiting the country. However, it is important that tourists receive the correct and appropriate medical treatment for their ailment, therefore we wanted to make the public aware of this potential problem and prevent any further tourists being caught out.”
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 8:07 am

Here is another type of scam that involves properties and the information about this comes from the site known as altinkumobserver.com: :-? :-B

"Stop property scam in Turkey
Altinkum | 12/04/2011

Regarding to columnist reports they have been receiving so many e-mails regarding property scams. Scammers walk around freely with the money they stole from property investors. Is there a way to put these people in jail? Is there a way to recuperate losses?

Just a couple of days ago I quoted an e-mail about a property scam. The sender is in a desperate situation the law does not really protect and, unfortunately, it is confounded by a lack of evidence and missing scammers. Here I’ll include some of the important parts of the letter:

“Hi, I am writing to ask for you advice on what may be a consumer rights issue. Five years ago my sister and brother-in-law bought an apartment from an estate agent. They paid 85,000 euros for the apartment. Due to the difficulties obtaining army permission and, as we later found out, the estate agent’s incompetency, they did not receive their army permission until last year.

“Due to personal problems in the family they could not take the tapu [title deed] at that time. On attempting to take over the tapu a few weeks ago, they were informed that they had to pay a further 21,000 euros to the builder … ?n?aat. The notary contract is with the builder.

“At the time of signing my bother-in-law requested the full amount to be written in. He was informed by the translator, builder and estate agent that the lower amount was custom and practice and all the council required. He was given to understand that the estate agent and builder where partners — something the builder now denies but did not at the time.

“The contract states all monies have been paid. When we approached the builder to transfer the tapu, he refused, stating the estate agent owed him money. We informed him that we did not see this as our problem but he was insistent and threatened to make things difficult — shutting off water and electricity to the apartment. How can the estate agent owing him money (who is to say it is even about this apartment) be the purchaser’s responsibility? The builder was present and signed the notary contract; surely something should have been said then?

“Since our meeting with the builder we have spoke to a lawyer, who informed us we had a case but it would cost us at least 8,500 euros to start it. My family does not have that sort of money…”

In between, the investor sought relief before various authorities without any solid results.

“…a few days later we were told this could not happen as the builder has a contract to build with his mother, entitling him to a number of apartments in return for the building. Ours is one of those apartments and apparently he has not informed the Tapu Office of this and as such we cannot do anything. This whole situation would be fraudulent in the UK and handled by the police. It appears to be an organized attempt to obtain more money than stated in the contracts. Is this a consumer rights case or criminal or both? Please could you advise? … Post-script: The estate agent is missing and has been for two years. I personally know he has cheated some more of my friends out of 100,000 euros for the purchase of land which he subsequently sold while they where awaiting their tapu.”

....this is a serious matter concerning huge amounts of money and that a criminal organization is involved.

This is not a lone case and there are thousands suffering from this. I am sure thousands of foreign investors were scammed in Turkey by local builders and real estate agents with the help of some officers who are now under arrest or before courts charged with serious crimes....

To demonstrate the mistake in the system of the foreign investor property business, I would like to give a brief outline of how the system works.

Briefly, agents and builders count on each other’s business. In other words, they in some ways become partners. On most projects they work with lawyers, certified translators and some other professionals. These professionals are deemed to be independent and are supposed to provide services to benefit the person who hired them. That said, the business of these people is also based on the presumption that the transaction will take place..."
:-? :-B

Here is also something additional about this issue from the site known as forum.kusadasi.biz: :-? :-B

"House scams in Turkey

Discussion in 'Real Estate in Kusadasi', Sep 30, 2009.

there was a good programme on Turkish TV about the scams that some of the builders and agents are up to.

One couple from Bodrum whose house has been sold twice and whose property has a debt against it too.

And another couple from Bafa Lake who are having problems with a builder ( unnamed) here in Didim.The house he's built them isn't the one he showed them and he wont give them their money back.

So it looks like, finally, this problem is being brought to public attention."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 5:43 pm

Here are more scams to consider that occur in Turkey and the information about this comes to us from the site known as scaminfo.org: :-?


"Turkey / Tourist Scams

Shoe Shine Scam

While walking though the city or sitting in a cafe, you'll see a shoe shiner walking by and 'accidentally' dropping one of his brushes. You will pick up a “fallen” brush and return it to the poor sod. This kind-hearted man will then start to shine your shoes “as his thank you for your assistance”.

He will then either charge you 10 times what the normal price of the shoe shine is or while you are taking some money out of your wallet, the man will jump up and snatch an additional bill from you wallet saying “I normally charge 100 lira but for you kind Mister, only 50 lira”. On either occasion, you'll overpay.

If you do actually need your shoes cleaned - agree a price in advance.

Credit Card Machine Does Not Work Scam


The mechanics of this scam are incredibly simple.

At a small shop you pay for something with your credit card and the shop-keeper will say that the credit card machine didn't work the first time, because it did not print a proper receipt. He will then run your card again! A few days later, having checked you card balance, you'll realize that you received a double charge.

We recommend you use your credit cards at larger shops/well-known franchises only and in the smaller ones pay with cash.

Blue Mosque Guides Scam

When walking through the gates of the Blue Mosque (or any other well known tourist destination), beware of smiling, friendly gentlemen offering to become your guides through the site and its surrounds.

They can be quite informative and know just about anything relating to this place and its history.

However, they would eventually demand a price for their "services", which would be 2-5 times higher than what you would have paid if you booked your private tour online.

Bar/Club scam

Friendly behaving groups of young people will strike up a conversation in the street and invite you to a "good nightclub they know".

As a prelude to the scam, they may offer to take you our for dinner first.

When at a club, you will usually be charged overpriced bills, based on a replica of the original menu, or simply on the menu that had been standing upside down on the table.

Let's Have a Drink Scam

A well-dressed man, fluent in English, will approach you and make some small talk.

The conversation will always lead in the same direction, whether you would like to join him for some after work drinks in a great place that he knows.

At this place you'll end up being presented with a bill to the tune of $100 for a cup of tea and should you fail to provide immediate payment, some intimidation would be forthcoming shortly.

Carpet or Leather Shop Scam

Should you find yourself a bit lost in any major city, a very friendly multilingual guy will approach you and ask if you need some help in locating some of the sightseeing spots and/or Grand Bazaar shops.

As he ‘guides’ you to these sites, he’ll pass some of his shops and remember he had to drop something off. He will of course invite you in to meet his family members. Before you know it, you’ll be drinking tea, eating snacks and listening to how only they in the whole town are still make quality leather (or carpets, or jewellery), and why you should buy something there.

If you are lost - take the initiative and ask for directions, don't let others approach you.

Lira/Euro Scam

Can happen in a variety of contexts, but normally takes place in smaller hotels. Upon arrival you will be quoted a price in Lira and then later, when you check out and the payment is due, they will claim the price was given in Euros.

Make sure you have paper evidence of the price you have agreed before checking in.

Overpricing Scam


Keep a watchful eye on the menus in street cafes for signs that prices are not discriminatory.

A good indication of an overly inflated price is availability of two different types of menu - the "foreigner" menu would typically be printed on a laminated card with menu prices written with a marker (i.e. prices are not printed) and the "local" menu (your standard menu).

Expect prices for foreigners to be highly inflated (200% or higher)."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 6:28 pm

Here is another aspect about scams in Turkey that we are warned about from the site known as kwintessential.co.uk: :-? :-B

"Shopping Scams in Turkey

You should be aware of friendly young Turkish men befriending you when you are shopping in Turkey as often these people will take a commission from any shop you buy from when you are with them. The price of your shopping is raised to pay for the guide’s commission so if you want the best prices while shopping in Turkey its best to do it alone or with a friend you trust who knows Turkey."
:-? :-B
User avatar
TheTruthTeller
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: Turkey's Troubles: Scams, Fraud, And Corruption In Turk

Post by TheTruthTeller » Tue May 29, 2012 7:10 pm

Here is more about the scam activity in Turkey. Here is a type of scam that has been already mentioned known as the Turkish carpet scam. The information about this scam comes to us from the site known as merhabaforums.com. It identifies a couple companies in Turkey involved in this kind of scam: :-? :-B

"Author: maryilyons
Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 10:32 am

This is just a warning to people living in Turkey or traveling to Turkey who want to buy carpets. One year ago I bought a carpet at ABC Carpets in Sultanahmet and was told it is a silk on cotton. It is 3' x 5' and my research tells me it is possible to buy a silk on cotton carpet of this size. I have recently bought kilims in Istanbul and decided to have my first carpet appraised by different dealers to find out if it really is silk on cotton. I did this because the dealer I bought my kilims from told me the Turks don't make floral patterns. These two dealers do not know each other and they live in different cities in Turkey. Both said the same thing and that is my carpet is made of synthetic material and it is made in China!!!!! I live in China! I did not go all the way to Istanbul to buy a Chinese carpet!

ABC Carpets has two locations - one in Sultanahmet and one in the Grand Bazaar by the Davidoff Cafe near Gate 1, the most popular entry point. I urge you, do not buy a carpet from these people. You would not believe the "business deal" they proposed to me when I just stopped in to say hello on my third trip to Istanbul. At this time, I did not know my carpet is a fake worth only 450 USD. I paid more than three times that amount! When I went in, because I had been there twice before and knew everyone by name, Volkan, the owner, tried to get me to do business with him so he could get his carpets into the US without paying the taxes. He is unscrupulous, dishonest, and so are the people who work for him, at least the ones I know. The guys who just show the carpets don't know what's going on, but the guys who sell them do.

I met two other people online who have had problems with ABC Carpets and their salesmen. It is a complete fluke how we met online, but our conversation led us both to tell our Turkish carpet stories, and theirs is even worse than mine and they bought their 6 carpets from the same shop!

I urge you not to shop there if you read this and please tell your friends to do the same."

Another contributor on the same site merhabaforums.com also shares their experience with this Turkish carpet scam: :-? :-B

"Author: yiani
Posted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 11:27 pm

I have recently had the same scam run on my wife and I from ABC carpet in the Grand Bazar in Istanbul and also the Bullseye carpet gallery in Istanbul.

I bought thousands of dollars worth of rugs, which i couldn't carry on my honeymoon and ask that those stores ship them to me, 3.5 months later they STILL have not arrived and both carpet dealers refuse to communicate.

WARNING: do not buy any carpets from these stores, they will try and scam you, upon doing a search on the web, i've found numerous similar stories from other tourists.

I'm writing a letter to the minister of tourism, and consular officials in Istanbul in order for local police to become involved.

I will be doing everything in my power to ensure these stores are investigated and prosecuted."


Here is yet another contributor who speaks about their experience with this Turkish carpet scam on the same site merhabaforums.com: :-? :-B

"Author: thxsparrow
Posted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:05 am

....I purchased carpets from ABC Rug Galeri in October 2008 and had the carpets tested in the United States by McInnis Rugs - 25+ years in the business and although my invoice from ABC says "Silk on Silk Hereke" the carpets were in fact shown to be "mercerized cotton" and "not of Turkish origin" but probably Chinese. In short, they are fake.

I haven't dated anyone from ABC, I am not a crank, I am an engineer, who was scammed by the best. I am still pursuing the matter with Turkish authorities as my credit card company, after months, was useless. The man I purchased from said his name was Ali. After the sale, he took us to his restaurant.

When I purchased the 4 carpets I bought, I was told that the certificate of authenticity must be shipped with the carpets. When I arrived back in the US, the carpets were there, but no certificate. I called and spoke with "Ali" who then told me that the certificate was being shipped separately. After three months, I had the rugs tested, paying $250 for a formal report. They were not silk, not Turkish, but were fakes - Chinese mercerized cotton. I was told by the credit card company that they would arrange to have them returned. After months, they told me I should now return them. I did and FedEx called and said ABC carpets refused to get the carpets from Customs, even though I sent over a dozen emails advising them that the carpets were there in Istanbul - I have the FedEx documents and the emails. Customs told me that if I did not bring them back to the States they would be seized, so I had them brought back to keep as evidence. (incidentally the round trip air freight cost me over $2000)

SO I know from personal experience and from the 16 pages of documentation provided to the credit card company that ABC Rug Galeri is in fact, a group of thieves. I am working now with the Tourist Bureau and will likely get Interpol involved. I hate thieves and I want to see these criminals and those who partner with them go to jail. They are bad for Turkey and will kill the market for Turkish handicrafts."
:-? :-B


Yet another contributor on the same forum merhabaforums.com says this about their experience with this Turkish carpet scam:
:-? :-B

"Author: clan
Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 5:21 am

...One year ago I purchased three rugs from Volkan Parpasik of ABC Rug Galleri in the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul. My experience is very similar to yours, I have received x2 rugs of inferior quality and no certificates of authentication. The third rug and most expensive, has been making it's way to Australia for the last twelve months according to Volkan but the promised delivery just never happens. I have contacted him so many times and each time he time he has lied to me with plausible excuses [and I believed him!] so that when I began to doubt him I felt guilty!!. This is surely a sign of his expertise in manipulation and thievery, I felt very stupid when I realized the truth but recovered my dignity when I decided that I had been cheated by one of the best and so had others.

....I note that he has tried to discredit another female customer on these ridiculous grounds, it's probably part of his modus operandi with solo female tourists to shut them up.

So there you have it, I have been "scammed../stolen from"
:-? :-B
Post Reply